Apr 12

Finalists, February/March, 2014

#TLLjournal || #february #march || #finalists || #loglines

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The prize-winning, top six loglines are listed in order.  The remaining finalists are listed in no particular order.

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Genre: Action/Adventure

Logline: A vengeful spy, obsessed with finding the terrorist who murdered his son, is on a routine mission to track down hijacked uranium when an unexpected turn of events brings him face-to-face with his nemesis. Now, he must make an impossible choice: eradicate the evil which killed his son or embrace it to bring him back from the dead.

Screenplay title:  The Blunt Edge

Accolades:

-Winner/ENDAS

-Third/The Indie Gathering

-Finalist/Extreme Feature

Written by: Joseph Baker

Email: bakerjbh@gmail.com

WGA Registration Number: 1566281

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Genre: Horror

Logline: The price of a mink-lined straightjacket? A couple of grand. The price of being strapped inside of it with your insane mother?  For a daughter, born and raised in a Gothic asylum, the price could be life itself.

Screenplay title: The Monsters of Raven Hill

Written by: B. Jane Boyle

Email: ib4art@msn.com

WGA Registration Number: 1706760

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Genre: Science Fiction

Logline: College students discover a photograph of a man talking on a cellphone; the photo is from 1938.

Screenplay title:  Friends Across the Universe

Written by: Alan S. Ferguson

Email: alsferguson@msn.com

WGA Registration Number: 1502603

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Genre: Drama

Logline: When her worried mother sues for legal guardianship, a horsewoman who has gone blind must enlist a shrewd attorney and fight to compete in a cross country race.

Screenplay title: Libby’s Bright Rainbow

Accolades:

-Finalist/Script Savvy

-Semi-Finalist/Script Vamp

-Quarterfinalist/Austin Screenwriting

Written by: Wendy Jane Henson

Email: wjhenson@frontier.com

WGA Registration Number: 1088548

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Genre: Comedy

Logline: A lonely and bulliedispH girl is befriended by an imaginary, half-crazed cartoon-like coyote, who takes her on a farcical but transcendent romp of a trip, where she faces clueless teachers, feckless parents, her own demons and—more important for any kid than the rest combined—the school bully.

Screenplay title:  Me and Chimichanga T.

Accolades: 

-Semi-Finalist/Scriptalooza

-Finalist/Script Vamp

Written by: David Mraz

Email: dmraz77@aol.com

WGA Registration Number: 1201338

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Genre: Drama/Mystery

Logline: While packing her deceased father’s attic, an obsessive child psychologist discovers a blood-scribed painting that leads her on a disturbing quest to solve a cold case others want to keep dead and buried.

Screenplay title: The Painting

Written by:  Tammy Olsen

Email: tlowrites@gmail.com

Registration Number: Pau3-705-236

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Genre: Comedy/Drama

Logline: The true story of the girl who won a national dance championship. She weighs 300 lbs, and can knock you out with one punch.

Screenplay title:  Dances with Fat

Written by: David Kassin Fried

Email: david@dkfwriting.com

Registration Number: Pau3-705-685

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Genre: Drama

Logline: A battered woman desperate to escape from her abuser frames him as a drug dealer. She builds a new life, only to face disaster when he gets an early release from prison.

Screenplay title:  Shatterdance

Accolades:

-Winner/Oregon Film and Video Awards

-Finalist/Script Savvy

-Quarterfinalist/Cynosure Awards

Written by: Wendy Jane Henson

Email: wendy@angelfire-arts.biz

WGA Registration Number: 1359988

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Genre: Comedy

Logline: When two hapless childhood friends enter a paintball tournament in hopes of collecting the million-dollar prize, they threaten the winning streak of a narcissistic billionaire.

Screenplay title:  Paintball the Movie

Written by: Mark Joenks, Chris Moberg & Rebecca Acker

Email: co-screenwriter@hotmail.com

WGA Registration Number: 1664635

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Genre: Comedy

Logline: An aspiring teen musician, suffering from OCD, inadvertently injures the mighty owner of a dinosaur-themed fast food dump and finds himself enslaved to two hundred hours of community service.

Screenplay title: Community Service

Written by: Chris Moberg & Rebecca Acker

Email: co-screenwriter@hotmail.com

WGA Registration Number: 1664629

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Genre: Science Fiction

Logline: When this batch of slovenly aliens invades earth; only a kindergarten teacher can save the planet.

Screenplay title:  The Stellar Educator

Written by: Alan S. Ferguson

Email: alsferguson@msn.com

WGA Registration Number: 1557763 

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Return to the Main Logline Page

Mar 27

Ten Top Tips For Writing A Micro Budget Script
Source: @ozzywood
"Writing low budget and Micro budget scripts is a waste of time!”Over eleven years of screenwriting I have lost count of the number of times I have heard, and indeed said, that phrase. It’s the mantra of many an arrogant writer, myself included, thinking I am god’s gift to screenwriting because I have read countless books, have attended numerous courses to develop my craft, and have had two of my 6 full feature screenplays optioned by producers. But I was wrong.
Of course we all want our scripts to be picked up by the greats of Hollywood and want to have our vision  turned into $250m movies where our work is launched into the stratosphere, lauded by our peers and appreciated by millions of acne ridden popcorn junkies – and that’s just the critics! Meanwhile back in the real world… we actually want to get one of our movies made and to do so we need to understand the concept of risk within a business that is one of the toughest and most competitive in the world.
The film business thrives on Darwinian economics – where money talks and the landscape is littered with burnout victims dying in the graveyard of ambition. The business, however, is not rocket science – the more expensive a movie is to make, the more bums on seats are required to make it viable. Of course the reverse is also true – if it is easier it is to recoup costs, the risks are lowered. The lower the risk, the more chances that a producer or an investor will step up to the plate. The lower the investment, the less the producer or investor has to lose and the more chances you will have to get your movie made.
So how do we specifically write a micro budget script that’s worthwhile?
Here are my Ten Top Tips for writing micro budget scripts:
1)    High Concept. Micro budget filmmaking absolutely depends on great story – a concept that has a great hook that will draw people in. But keep it simple. For example,  our micro budget movie 54 Days is about 5 people trapped in a nuclear shelter surrounded by nuclear and biological contamination without enough food and water to go round. Either one dies or all five die. It’s simple – but primal.
2)    Think like a producer. Before you start writing the first FADE IN, try to carry out a financial audit in your mind of your concept. Focus on the big print – how can you squeeze out every cost in your story without compromising the heart. If you have already written your script, give it a “financial edit”. Take the time to read the big print by itself with a cold, hard eye on cash; on how much things cost and how can you reduce those costs. If it means re-writing scenes – so be it. So often you will be surprised to discover new aspects of your story, and new dimensions to your character. Remember there is never a problem – only an opportunity for improvement!
3)    Locations – eradicate  them. Each time you have a new location, you have to move an entire crew. That takes time. Reducing the locations to an absolute minimum reduces the time taken……”
Click below to read full article…. 

Ten Top Tips For Writing A Micro Budget Script

Source: @ozzywood

"Writing low budget and Micro budget scripts is a waste of time!”
Over eleven years of screenwriting I have lost count of the number of times I have heard, and indeed said, that phrase. It’s the mantra of many an arrogant writer, myself included, thinking I am god’s gift to screenwriting because I have read countless books, have attended numerous courses to develop my craft, and have had two of my 6 full feature screenplays optioned by producers. But I was wrong.

Of course we all want our scripts to be picked up by the greats of Hollywood and want to have our vision  turned into $250m movies where our work is launched into the stratosphere, lauded by our peers and appreciated by millions of acne ridden popcorn junkies – and that’s just the critics! Meanwhile back in the real world… we actually want to get one of our movies made and to do so we need to understand the concept of risk within a business that is one of the toughest and most competitive in the world.

The film business thrives on Darwinian economics – where money talks and the landscape is littered with burnout victims dying in the graveyard of ambition. The business, however, is not rocket science – the more expensive a movie is to make, the more bums on seats are required to make it viable. Of course the reverse is also true – if it is easier it is to recoup costs, the risks are lowered. The lower the risk, the more chances that a producer or an investor will step up to the plate. The lower the investment, the less the producer or investor has to lose and the more chances you will have to get your movie made.

So how do we specifically write a micro budget script that’s worthwhile?

Here are my Ten Top Tips for writing micro budget scripts:

1)    High Concept. Micro budget filmmaking absolutely depends on great story – a concept that has a great hook that will draw people in. But keep it simple. For example,  our micro budget movie 54 Days is about 5 people trapped in a nuclear shelter surrounded by nuclear and biological contamination without enough food and water to go round. Either one dies or all five die. It’s simple – but primal.

2)    Think like a producer. Before you start writing the first FADE IN, try to carry out a financial audit in your mind of your concept. Focus on the big print – how can you squeeze out every cost in your story without compromising the heart. If you have already written your script, give it a “financial edit”. Take the time to read the big print by itself with a cold, hard eye on cash; on how much things cost and how can you reduce those costs. If it means re-writing scenes – so be it. So often you will be surprised to discover new aspects of your story, and new dimensions to your character. Remember there is never a problem – only an opportunity for improvement!

3)    Locations – eradicate  them. Each time you have a new location, you have to move an entire crew. That takes time. Reducing the locations to an absolute minimum reduces the time taken……”

Click below to read full article…. 

(Source: thestorydepartment.com)

Tarantino Continues War With Gawker
Source: @CourthouseNews
#screenwriting #film #story
"Quentin Tarantino is fighting Gawker Media’s attempt to dismiss his lawsuit against what he calls a "predatory" news service.     Tarantino filed an opposition to Gawker’s motion to dismiss his January complaint against the entertainment gossip news site.     Tarantino claimed in his federal lawsuit that Gawker encouraged its millions of readers to track down and leak “The Hateful Eight” screenplay after it had found its way into the hands of a few Hollywood insiders.     Tarantino says there was no journalistic reason for the website to link to the script.     Tarantino told Deadline.com in January that someone had leaked “The Hateful Eight” screenplay after he shared it with a small group of actors, including nonparties Michael Madsen, Bruce Dern and Tim Roth. Revealing that he planned to nix the project and seek a publisher for the screenplay, Tarantino said he suspected that either Madsen’s or Dern’s agents were behind the leak.     ”One of the others let their agent read it, and that agent has now passed it on to everyone in Hollywood. I don’t know how these fucking agents work, but I’m not making this next,” Tarantino told Deadline at the time. “I’m going to publish it, and that’s it for now. I give it out to six people, and if I can’t trust them to that degree, then I have no desire to make it. I’ll publish it. I’m done. I’ll move on to the next thing. I’ve got 10 more where that came from.”     Days later, in an article headlined, “Here Is the Leaked Quentin Tarantino Hateful Eight Script,” Gawker posted a link to an anonymous download of a pdf copy of the screenplay at a site called AnonFiles.com.     On Jan. 27, Tarantino sued Gawker and its affiliates for contributory copyright infringement and the unidentified leaker, or leakers, for copyright infringement. The filmmaker wants at least $1 million in damages.     Reacting to the lawsuit, Gawker said it had not leaked the script, had only reported that the script was online, and linked to it after receiving a tip from a reader. The site claimed that it was Tarantino who had made the story newsworthy by talking to Deadline about the initial leak in the first place.     The site denied Tarantino’s claim that it had access to the script before AnonFiles made it available for download.     ”No one at Gawker transmitted it - or anything else, at all - to AnonFiles. No one at Gawker encouraged anyone to do so. No one at Gawker has any earthly idea how AnonFiles obtained a copy,” Gawker said.     Tarantino claims, however, that Gawker “contrived the very ‘news story’ that it now seeks to hide behind” and “solicited” readers to provide it with a copy of his copyrighted…….”
Click below to read full article…. 

Tarantino Continues War With Gawker

Source: @CourthouseNews

#screenwriting #film #story

"Quentin Tarantino is fighting Gawker Media’s attempt to dismiss his lawsuit against what he calls a "predatory" news service.
     Tarantino filed an opposition to Gawker’s motion to dismiss his January complaint against the entertainment gossip news site.
     Tarantino claimed in his federal lawsuit that Gawker encouraged its millions of readers to track down and leak “The Hateful Eight” screenplay after it had found its way into the hands of a few Hollywood insiders.
     Tarantino says there was no journalistic reason for the website to link to the script.
     Tarantino told Deadline.com in January that someone had leaked “The Hateful Eight” screenplay after he shared it with a small group of actors, including nonparties Michael Madsen, Bruce Dern and Tim Roth. Revealing that he planned to nix the project and seek a publisher for the screenplay, Tarantino said he suspected that either Madsen’s or Dern’s agents were behind the leak.
     ”One of the others let their agent read it, and that agent has now passed it on to everyone in Hollywood. I don’t know how these fucking agents work, but I’m not making this next,” Tarantino told Deadline at the time. “I’m going to publish it, and that’s it for now. I give it out to six people, and if I can’t trust them to that degree, then I have no desire to make it. I’ll publish it. I’m done. I’ll move on to the next thing. I’ve got 10 more where that came from.”
     Days later, in an article headlined, “Here Is the Leaked Quentin Tarantino Hateful Eight Script,” Gawker posted a link to an anonymous download of a pdf copy of the screenplay at a site called AnonFiles.com.
     On Jan. 27, Tarantino sued Gawker and its affiliates for contributory copyright infringement and the unidentified leaker, or leakers, for copyright infringement. The filmmaker wants at least $1 million in damages.
     Reacting to the lawsuit, Gawker said it had not leaked the script, had only reported that the script was online, and linked to it after receiving a tip from a reader. The site claimed that it was Tarantino who had made the story newsworthy by talking to Deadline about the initial leak in the first place.
     The site denied Tarantino’s claim that it had access to the script before AnonFiles made it available for download.
     ”No one at Gawker transmitted it - or anything else, at all - to AnonFiles. No one at Gawker encouraged anyone to do so. No one at Gawker has any earthly idea how AnonFiles obtained a copy,” Gawker said.
     Tarantino claims, however, that Gawker “contrived the very ‘news story’ that it now seeks to hide behind” and “solicited” readers to provide it with a copy of his copyrighted…….”

Click below to read full article…. 

(Source: courthousenews.com)

[video]

Mar 24

INNER DRIVES: What’s My Character Motivation? Driving the Character Arcs
Source: @scriptmag and Pamela Jaye Smith
#screenwriting #film #story
"The INNER DRIVES offer an excellent paradigm for moving your character through various states of mind, emotions, and actions.
There are basically three approaches to character arcs: up, down, or static. Each approach has its own particular Opposition and Assistance.
Your heroine’s Inner Drive and Goal will be one of these:
1. Static Aspiration – to hold or perfect the current Center 2. Upward Aspiration – to attain a higher Center 3. Fall & Redemption – to regain a Center from which she was tempted or displaced
Both the Assistance and the Opposition can come from their current Inner Drive Center, a higher one, or a lower one.
STATIC ASPIRATION
These stories will often be about sports, skills, or relationships. Your character’s goals and desires will be variations on the same Inner Drive. They could be in competition with someone else on the same Center or, seeking to master some aspect of the Center which has eluded them. Most martial arts films are about holding one’s own against all comers, which is not to say they aren’t fun and exciting.
Romantic comedies are about achieving goals and satisfaction on the romantic Centers, Sacral and/or Aspirational Solar Plexus.
UPWARD ASPIRATION
Many stories are about someone desperately wanting something they do not have, be it a person, a position, or possessions. It makes for good storytelling to watch them yearn and strive against the challenges and obstacles.
Evita Peron was a streetwalker (Sacral) who marries a dictator (Lower Solar Plexus) but then works to help the ordinary people (Aspirational Solar Plexus).
Indiana Jones is also forced up from self-centered Lower Solar to self-sacrificing Aspirational Solar by outside circumstances as Raiders of the Lost Ark propels him to battle the Nazis for possession of the Ark.
FALL AND (sometimes) REDEMPTION
Your heroine is either tempted down or forced down into a lower Center by her own weaknesses (addictions, foibles, etc.), by other people (temptation, abduction, war, etc.), or by events (floods, hurricanes, depressions, comets, etc.).
WEAKNESS – The character falls, explores the new Center, but then rises even higher than where they were before, even though they had not had that in mind in the…..”
Click below to read full article. 

INNER DRIVES: What’s My Character Motivation? Driving the Character Arcs

Source: @scriptmag and Pamela Jaye Smith

#screenwriting #film #story

"The INNER DRIVES offer an excellent paradigm for moving your character through various states of mind, emotions, and actions.

There are basically three approaches to character arcs: up, down, or static. Each approach has its own particular Opposition and Assistance.

Your heroine’s Inner Drive and Goal will be one of these:

1. Static Aspiration – to hold or perfect the current Center
2. Upward Aspiration – to attain a higher Center
3. Fall & Redemption – to regain a Center from which she was tempted or displaced

Both the Assistance and the Opposition can come from their current Inner Drive Center, a higher one, or a lower one.

STATIC ASPIRATION

These stories will often be about sports, skills, or relationships. Your character’s goals and desires will be variations on the same Inner Drive. They could be in competition with someone else on the same Center or, seeking to master some aspect of the Center which has eluded them.
Most martial arts films are about holding one’s own against all comers, which is not to say they aren’t fun and exciting.

Romantic comedies are about achieving goals and satisfaction on the romantic Centers, Sacral and/or Aspirational Solar Plexus.

UPWARD ASPIRATION

Many stories are about someone desperately wanting something they do not have, be it a person, a position, or possessions. It makes for good storytelling to watch them yearn and strive against the challenges and obstacles.

Evita Peron was a streetwalker (Sacral) who marries a dictator (Lower Solar Plexus) but then works to help the ordinary people (Aspirational Solar Plexus).

Indiana Jones is also forced up from self-centered Lower Solar to self-sacrificing Aspirational Solar by outside circumstances as Raiders of the Lost Ark propels him to battle the Nazis for possession of the Ark.

FALL AND (sometimes) REDEMPTION

Your heroine is either tempted down or forced down into a lower Center by her own weaknesses (addictions, foibles, etc.), by other people (temptation, abduction, war, etc.), or by events (floods, hurricanes, depressions, comets, etc.).

WEAKNESS – The character falls, explores the new Center, but then rises even higher than where they were before, even though they had not had that in mind in the…..”

Click below to read full article. 

(Source: scriptmag.com)