Mar 17

Classic Beats from Five Disney Animated Films
Source: @savethecat
#screenwriting #film #story
“Our thanks to Master Cat! Cory Milles for this perceptive blog:
From the early days of hand-drawn cells to its recent offerings of CGI, Disney animated films have always connected with audiences in a powerful way, and with good reason: they never fail to hit the beats. Here is a sampling of some great examples (all artwork ©Disney):
Wreck-It Ralph (2012) — As video game bad guy Ralph sits in a support group, Bad-Anon, he proclaims that he wants to break more than buildings; he wants to smash the stereotype of the role he seems to be stuck in. One of the characters declares that Ralph can’t change the program, implying that we can’t change who we are predestined to be. This is the Theme Stated, and it is what Ralph will debate and discover on his journey.
After bonding with his companion Vanellope and overcoming his badness, he learns that all is not as it seems, and to protect Vanellope, he must act in a way that will destroy their friendship. As he demolishes the car they built together, All Is Lost for Ralph as Vanellope yells at him, telling him that he really is a bad guy deep down. The death of their friendship and the death of Ralph’s character growth is at hand. Later, to save Vanellope, he must sacrifice himself. As he plummets to the ground below, he Digs Down Deep and recites the Bad Guy Affirmation: “I’m bad, and that’s good. I will never be good, and that’s not bad. There’s no one I’d rather be than me.” Ralph has realized that it doesn’t matter who others think he is; he knows deep down.
UP (2009) — The Set-Up is masterfully done in only a few minutes of scenes set to emotional music, introducing the audience to Carl Fredricksen and his wife Ellie. During those brief minutes, we watch as their relationship develops from a childhood friendship to a devoted marriage, sharing in their joys and hardships. As his wife passes, Carl’s motivation is completely clear, helping us understand his actions, making us sympathize with him. We know what he wants, but we also know what he needs. And all in under six minutes.
Carl finally realizes what he needs during his All Is Lost moment. After ridding himself of Russell, the boy who accompanied him on his journey, Carl sits alone in isolation, flipping through the scrapbook his wife left for him. He has what he wants, but only recognizes what he needs as he reads one final note scrawled by Ellie. In his Dark Night of the Soul, Carl understands that he needs to live on, ridding himself of the past that has weighed…..”
Click below to read full post

Classic Beats from Five Disney Animated Films

Source: @savethecat

#screenwriting #film #story

Our thanks to Master Cat! Cory Milles for this perceptive blog:

From the early days of hand-drawn cells to its recent offerings of CGI, Disney animated films have always connected with audiences in a powerful way, and with good reason: they never fail to hit the beats. Here is a sampling of some great examples (all artwork ©Disney):

Wreck-It Ralph (2012) — As video game bad guy Ralph sits in a support group, Bad-Anon, he proclaims that he wants to break more than buildings; he wants to smash the stereotype of the role he seems to be stuck in. One of the characters declares that Ralph can’t change the program, implying that we can’t change who we are predestined to be. This is the Theme Stated, and it is what Ralph will debate and discover on his journey.

After bonding with his companion Vanellope and overcoming his badness, he learns that all is not as it seems, and to protect Vanellope, he must act in a way that will destroy their friendship. As he demolishes the car they built together, All Is Lost for Ralph as Vanellope yells at him, telling him that he really is a bad guy deep down. The death of their friendship and the death of Ralph’s character growth is at hand. Later, to save Vanellope, he must sacrifice himself. As he plummets to the ground below, he Digs Down Deep and recites the Bad Guy Affirmation: “I’m bad, and that’s good. I will never be good, and that’s not bad. There’s no one I’d rather be than me.” Ralph has realized that it doesn’t matter who others think he is; he knows deep down.

UP (2009) — The Set-Up is masterfully done in only a few minutes of scenes set to emotional music, introducing the audience to Carl Fredricksen and his wife Ellie. During those brief minutes, we watch as their relationship develops from a childhood friendship to a devoted marriage, sharing in their joys and hardships. As his wife passes, Carl’s motivation is completely clear, helping us understand his actions, making us sympathize with him. We know what he wants, but we also know what he needs. And all in under six minutes.

Carl finally realizes what he needs during his All Is Lost moment. After ridding himself of Russell, the boy who accompanied him on his journey, Carl sits alone in isolation, flipping through the scrapbook his wife left for him. He has what he wants, but only recognizes what he needs as he reads one final note scrawled by Ellie. In his Dark Night of the Soul, Carl understands that he needs to live on, ridding himself of the past that has weighed…..”

Click below to read full post

Feb 22

Jeanne’s Tuesday Screenwriting Tips: Outlining a Script
Source: @scriptmag @jeannevb
#screenwriting #film #story
“To outline or not to outline a script? That is the eternal question for writers. At least it is for some, but not for me. (Well, maybe the real eternal question is how do I get paid to write, but we’ll leave that for another day.) Because I am the kind of chick who needs a plan, outlines are always the foundations of my projects, especially when working with a writing partner.
You can find plot development tips in many places, but implementing them is another story. The first step is to breathe. You are not alone. Many writers struggle with starting projects, myself included. So let’s explore some options in hopes you’ll find one that works best for you.
First off, there’s no one way to outline. Some writers jot notes on bar napkins or use index cards while others prefer a more techy approach of using software, like Truby’s Blockbuster 6.0 or Save the Cat! It all depends on what gets you excited. As you already know, you will not sit in that seat and write unless you’re having fun doing it.
I’ve tried many ways of outlining, finally formulating a spreadsheet by merging several techniques together in what I call my Structure Grid of Character and Plot Development (I’ve shared this with our readers as one of our many free screenwriting downloads). But spreadsheets aren’t always “fun” for writers.
One of my screenwriting friends uses the first chapter of Pilar Alessandra’s The Coffee Break Screenwriter: Writing Your Script Ten Minutes at a Time to help her outline her scripts. For all of us who have day jobs, writing in 10-minute chucks sounds amazing! I’m definitely going to try…..”
Click below to read full article

Jeanne’s Tuesday Screenwriting Tips: Outlining a Script

Source: @scriptmag @jeannevb

#screenwriting #film #story

To outline or not to outline a script? That is the eternal question for writers. At least it is for some, but not for me. (Well, maybe the real eternal question is how do I get paid to write, but we’ll leave that for another day.) Because I am the kind of chick who needs a plan, outlines are always the foundations of my projects, especially when working with a writing partner.

You can find plot development tips in many places, but implementing them is another story. The first step is to breathe. You are not alone. Many writers struggle with starting projects, myself included. So let’s explore some options in hopes you’ll find one that works best for you.

First off, there’s no one way to outline. Some writers jot notes on bar napkins or use index cards while others prefer a more techy approach of using software, like Truby’s Blockbuster 6.0 or Save the Cat! It all depends on what gets you excited. As you already know, you will not sit in that seat and write unless you’re having fun doing it.

I’ve tried many ways of outlining, finally formulating a spreadsheet by merging several techniques together in what I call my Structure Grid of Character and Plot Development (I’ve shared this with our readers as one of our many free screenwriting downloads). But spreadsheets aren’t always “fun” for writers.

One of my screenwriting friends uses the first chapter of Pilar Alessandra’s The Coffee Break Screenwriter: Writing Your Script Ten Minutes at a Time to help her outline her scripts. For all of us who have day jobs, writing in 10-minute chucks sounds amazing! I’m definitely going to try…..”

Click below to read full article

Feb 11

Finalists, December/January, 2014

#TLLjournal || #december #january || #finalists || #loglines

—————

The prize-winning, top six loglines are listed in order.  The remaining finalists are listed in no particular order.

—————

Genre: Historical Drama

Logline: When an anxious wife decides she can no longer stay at home in the stifling indentured life of a woman in the 1860’s, she dons a soldier uniform, hides her identity from the rest of society, and searches for equality fighting alongside her husband who has just enlisted in the Civil War.

Screenplay title:  Frances

Written by: Dina Payne

Email: dedesbook@yahoo.com

WGA Registration Number: 1690238

—————

Genre: Comedy Thriller

Logline: When four disabled people discover a dishonest social worker has taken a bribe to force them from their house, they frame him for the unlikely heist they must commit to save their home.

Screenplay title:  ThisAbility

Accolades:

-Finalist / All Access Screenwriting Competition for feature Senior Moments

-Semi-Finalist / Filmmakers International Screenwriting Awards for feature Getting Betta

-Semi-Finalist / Write Movies Screenwriting Competition for feature Cure for Love

Written by: Don Fried & Mike Fuhrmann

Email: don@fried.cc

WGA Registration Number: 1-1169330891

—————

Genre:  Sci-fi, Action

Logline: The year is 2045. Vikram Rao, creator of Infinilife, a technology that allows for immortality, discovers himself in the body of a homeless man just as an imposter takes control of his company. Along with Elena, his newly hired head of security, Vik must uncover the mysterious forces working against him while evading attack by a group of seemingly unkillable assassins.

Screenplay title:  The End of Death

Written by: Alfonso Guerrero

Email: whoisguerrero@gmail.com

WGA Registration Number: 1683712

—————

Genre: Horror

Logline: Still reeling from the premature death of their first born, a desperate couple make an agreement with a miracle-working doctor to help conceive, only to learn his power comes from a group of murderous black-eyed kids who will stop at nothing to “collect” on their dues.

Screenplay title:  The Collectors

Accolades:

Quarter-Finalist / ScreamCraft Horror Script Contest 2013

Written by:  Justin Bamforth

Email: justin_bamforth@yahoo.com

WGA Registration Number: 1614647

—————

Genre: Drama

Logline: Upon return home with her newborn son, a young mother finds that her child’s father left her and took all her possessions with him. Bitter and disillusioned, she swears to raise her son to be the murderer of his father. She succeeds beyond her expectations.

Screenplay title:  To Raise a Murderer

Written by: Svetlana Lockwood

Email: svetlana.lockwood@email.wsu.edu

WGA Registration Number: 1702085

————-

Genre: Fantasy

Logline: “Downton Abbey” goes Grand Guignol. A camel mysteriously appears on the doorstep of a vicar and his wife, and dramatically changes their lives, causing misery and terror for rich and poor in their small English village.

Screenplay title: Beast at the Door

Accolades:

-1st Place, Fade In Awards (Noir Category) for BLIND TURN

-Finalist, Table Read My Screenplay - Screenplay Contest for “DECEIT: The True Story of the Amorous Landlady”

-Semi-Finalist, Fade In Awards and Scriptapalooza Screenwriting Competition for WINDFALL!

Written by: Bob Canning

Email: thewriteguy@comcast.net

WGA Registration Number: 1562092

—————

Genre: Thriller

Logline: After being stranded on a deserted highway during a treacherous snow storm, an unsuspecting family becomes terrorized by a man seeking revenge.  In a race against time, the town sheriff, must stop him before the family pays the ultimate price for mistakes made in the past.

Screenplay title:  Snow Advisory

Accolades:

-Finalist/ Colorado Film Festival

-Finalist/ Filmmakers International Screen writing awards

-Quarter Finalist/Scriptapalooza

Written by:  Lisa Beuk

Email: LisaBeuk@gmail.com

WGA Registration Number: 1237234

————

Genre: Drama.

Logline: Years after his wife’s death, a Philosophy professor re-encounters someone very like her among his students, coming face to face with the very dilemma he teaches: what if?

Screenplay title: Anam Cara

Written by: Calla Parmly

Email: CallaHaruka@hotmail.com

WGA Registration Number: 1674438

—————

Genre: Suspense, Comedy

Logline: After stumbling upon a brutal murder, a bungling burglar with a weak stomach is determined to find the killer for the sake of the cat and dog left behind.

Screenplay title:  For the Love of P&D

Written by: Youlanda Brewster

Email: youlandabrewster@yahoo.com

WGA Registration Number: 1699495

—————

Genre: Action/Thriller

Logline: It’s evil versus evil when a group of convicts are sent to an abandoned prison where they are hunted by three psychotic inmates, but the game is turned on its head when the teenage daughter of one of the convicts comes to break him out.

Screenplay title:  Hell’s Prison

Accolades:

-3rd Place/2010 The-Greenlight.com - 2nd Annual Contest - REMATCH

-Finalist/2013 Writemovies 31st - REMATCH

-Finalist/2013 Action On Film – Written Word Competition – SIRENS VENDETTA

Written by: Antoine Mizel

Email: damiz78@yahoo.com

WGA Registration Number: 1362232

———-

Genre: Comedy/Drama

Logline: Torn between his religious beliefs and the thrill of gambling, a brilliant inventor and Baptist family-man, desperate to break out of his dead-end job, invents the world’s first personal computer and uses it to take on the blackjack tables in Vegas.

Screenplay title:  David vs. Vegas

Accolades:

-First Place Winner, TVME Contest - “ Gate’s Flying Circus”

-Quarter-finalist, Nicholl Fellowship – “ Victoria’s Gold “

-Semi-finalist, American Accolades – “One Shot at Glory”

Written by:  Dennis DeBon

Email: FlaScreenwriter@aol.com

WGA Registration Number:  1249239

—————

Genre: Romance/Musical/Comedy

Logline: A young blonde “go-getter”, raised in a typical black family finds you don’t have to give up love and music just to make it in the corporate world, and that sometimes lies become the most delicious truths. Lesson courtesy of a sexy young homeless sax player. (HIGH SCHOOL MUSICAL for adults.)

Screenplay title:  The Joy of Life

Written by: Youlanda Brewster

Email: youlandabrewster@yahoo.com

WGA Registration Number: 1699497

—————

Genre: Drama

Logline: As an assassination plot unfolds against a rising African American presidential candidate, he must make a decision to carry on his family legacy of breaking down barriers or submit to the pressures engulfing his life.

Screenplay title:  Houses on the Rock

Accolades:

-Semi-Finalist/Acclaim Scripts

-Semi-Finalist/Write Reality TV Show Idea, for the reality show, “I’ve Got to Tell You”

-Finalist/Scriptapalozza, for the reality show, “I’ve Got to Tell You”

Written by: Kenneth Masler & Daniel  Mahoney

Email: kmasler@pridemobility.com

WGA Registration Number: I259988

—————

Genre: Comedy/Drama

Logline: A young fashion designer must overcome her crippling social anxiety as she gains access to New York’s elite through her long lost aunt.

Screenplay title:  The Mean Reds

Written by:  Liri Navon

Email: liri.navon@gmail.com

WGA Registration Number: 1681790

—————

Genre: Thriller

Logline: Using lucid dream techniques, a promising musician investigates his haunting visions and dreams while trying to maintain reality with his wife and son.

Screenplay title:  Lament

Written by: Mitch Flores

Email: mitchflores@hotmail.com

WGA Registration Number: 166606

—————

Genre: Fantasy/Rom-Com

Logline: A middle age man falls for the descendent of a Greek Goddess who causes him to get younger.

Screenplay title:  25/50

Written by: Alan S. Ferguson

Email: alsferguson@msn.com

WGA Registration Number: Copyright PAu 3-681-013

—————

Return to the Main Logline Page

Jan 02

Six Second Screenwriting Advice and Why All Screenwriting Books are a Con
Source: @indiewire @briankoppelman
#screenwriting #film #story
"A few months back, I started making Vines. I called them Six Second Screenwriting Lessons. The name meant to be ironic, of course, a statement on the absurdity of anyone teaching anyone else to write a screenplay, a way of calling out the screenwriting gurus who make money by sharing the ‘secrets’ of the trade with anyone willing to pony up a few (or a ton) of bucks. The way I felt then is the way I feel now: all anyone in a creative field can do for anyone else is to be an example, to encourage, to be honest about the challenges and rewards of attempting the same path.
I’m glad that some of you have gotten something of value out of these messages. To those who have gotten in touch with me to say that they are writing again after a long hiatus or finally finishing that screenplay, I want you to know that I’m thrilled for you. And I hope 2014 brings you even more accomplishment…
Now that 2013 has come to a close, I want to revisit two of the most controversial Vines.  
On the first Six Second Screenwriting Lesson, I said, “All screenwriting books are bullshit. All. Watch movies. Read screenplays. Let them be your guide. And then on the fourth one, I said, “The so-called screenwriting guru is really the so-called screenwriting con man. Don’t listen to them, if you don’t know their movies.”
Since then, I have been asked many times, “Do you really mean all screenwriting books? Aren’t there any of any value?” And, “Are you including Robert McKee in those statements?”
There’s a safe way to answer those questions, and it’s an answer I’ve given, “I haven’t read every book. There are parts of McKee’s book that are interesting. Some screenwriters I respect, including Billy Ray and Akiva Goldsman have told me that they’ve gotten a lot out of McKee’s course…”
But if I am being honest, my real answer is that I fully believe what I said in the Vines. 
Yes, McKee has been able to break down how the popular screenplay has worked. He has identified key qualities that many commercially successful screenplays share, he has codified a language that has been adopted by creative executives in both film and television. So there might be something of tangible value to be gained by interacting with his material, either in book form or at one of the seminars.
But for someone who wants to be an artist, a creator, an architect of an original vision, the best book to read on screenwriting is……”
Click below to read the full article

Six Second Screenwriting Advice and Why All Screenwriting Books are a Con

Source: @indiewire @briankoppelman

#screenwriting #film #story

"A few months back, I started making Vines. I called them Six Second Screenwriting Lessons. The name meant to be ironic, of course, a statement on the absurdity of anyone teaching anyone else to write a screenplay, a way of calling out the screenwriting gurus who make money by sharing the ‘secrets’ of the trade with anyone willing to pony up a few (or a ton) of bucks. The way I felt then is the way I feel now: all anyone in a creative field can do for anyone else is to be an example, to encourage, to be honest about the challenges and rewards of attempting the same path.

I’m glad that some of you have gotten something of value out of these messages. To those who have gotten in touch with me to say that they are writing again after a long hiatus or finally finishing that screenplay, I want you to know that I’m thrilled for you. And I hope 2014 brings you even more accomplishment…

Now that 2013 has come to a close, I want to revisit two of the most controversial Vines.  

On the first Six Second Screenwriting Lesson, I said, “All screenwriting books are bullshit. All. Watch movies. Read screenplays. Let them be your guide. And then on the fourth one, I said, “The so-called screenwriting guru is really the so-called screenwriting con man. Don’t listen to them, if you don’t know their movies.”

Since then, I have been asked many times, “Do you really mean all screenwriting books? Aren’t there any of any value?” And, “Are you including Robert McKee in those statements?”

There’s a safe way to answer those questions, and it’s an answer I’ve given, “I haven’t read every book. There are parts of McKee’s book that are interesting. Some screenwriters I respect, including Billy Ray and Akiva Goldsman have told me that they’ve gotten a lot out of McKee’s course…”

But if I am being honest, my real answer is that I fully believe what I said in the Vines. 

Yes, McKee has been able to break down how the popular screenplay has worked. He has identified key qualities that many commercially successful screenplays share, he has codified a language that has been adopted by creative executives in both film and television. So there might be something of tangible value to be gained by interacting with his material, either in book form or at one of the seminars.

But for someone who wants to be an artist, a creator, an architect of an original vision, the best book to read on screenwriting is……”

Click below to read the full article

Dec 27

Is Hollywood’s blockbuster model broken?
Source: @BBCBusiness
#screenwriting #film #story
"It may have lacked a generation-defining event movie like 1977’s Star Wars, or even a technological groundbreaker like 2009’s Avatar, but 2013 was still the year of the Hollywood blockbuster.
This year, 26 films costing more than $100m (£61m) each were released by the major Hollywood studios - more than ever before. They are likely to have raked in tens of billions of dollars in worldwide box office revenues as a result - close to the record $35bn (£21.5bn) delivered in 2012.
Some of the films did badly. The Lone Ranger, starring Johnny Depp, barely made back the $250m it cost to make. But the hits outweighed the flops: Iron Man 3 took $1.2bn in box office receipts around the world, topping the charts and making it the fifth highest-grossing film of all time.
But despite the runaway successes, there are concerns within Tinseltown that blockbuster budgets are getting dangerously high.
Bankrupted
"There’s eventually going to be an implosion, or a big meltdown," said Hollywood elder statesman Steven Spielberg in a speech earlier this year. "Three or four or maybe even a half dozen mega-budget movies are going to go crashing into the ground, and that’s going to change the paradigm."
Steven Spielberg has warned of an “implosion” in Hollywood
It has happened before. In 1980, Heaven’s Gate effectively bankrupted United Artists. The budget for the sprawling Western got out of control, the film bombed, and the studio was forced into a takeover by MGM.
The irony is that Spielberg almost singlehandedly invented the blockbuster genre. When his film Jaws was released in 1975, Hollywood realised that making a few big-budget films a year that appealed to the masses was more lucrative than making dozens of smaller ones, and a business model was born. Since then budgets have soared and artistic merit has taken a back seat.
Hollywood watchers say it’s a statistical certainty that another bomb to rival Heaven’s Gate, or even 1995’s Waterworld, is around…..”
Click below for full article 

Is Hollywood’s blockbuster model broken?

Source: @BBCBusiness

#screenwriting #film #story

"It may have lacked a generation-defining event movie like 1977’s Star Wars, or even a technological groundbreaker like 2009’s Avatar, but 2013 was still the year of the Hollywood blockbuster.

This year, 26 films costing more than $100m (£61m) each were released by the major Hollywood studios - more than ever before. They are likely to have raked in tens of billions of dollars in worldwide box office revenues as a result - close to the record $35bn (£21.5bn) delivered in 2012.

Some of the films did badly. The Lone Ranger, starring Johnny Depp, barely made back the $250m it cost to make. But the hits outweighed the flops: Iron Man 3 took $1.2bn in box office receipts around the world, topping the charts and making it the fifth highest-grossing film of all time.

But despite the runaway successes, there are concerns within Tinseltown that blockbuster budgets are getting dangerously high.

Bankrupted

"There’s eventually going to be an implosion, or a big meltdown," said Hollywood elder statesman Steven Spielberg in a speech earlier this year. "Three or four or maybe even a half dozen mega-budget movies are going to go crashing into the ground, and that’s going to change the paradigm."

Steven Spielberg has warned of an “implosion” in Hollywood

It has happened before. In 1980, Heaven’s Gate effectively bankrupted United Artists. The budget for the sprawling Western got out of control, the film bombed, and the studio was forced into a takeover by MGM.

The irony is that Spielberg almost singlehandedly invented the blockbuster genre. When his film Jaws was released in 1975, Hollywood realised that making a few big-budget films a year that appealed to the masses was more lucrative than making dozens of smaller ones, and a business model was born. Since then budgets have soared and artistic merit has taken a back seat.

Hollywood watchers say it’s a statistical certainty that another bomb to rival Heaven’s Gate, or even 1995’s Waterworld, is around…..”

Click below for full article